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The Ultimate Housewarming Party For Your Waterfront Home

by Lucy Hudson,

A housewarming party is a perfect way to celebrate your new house with family and friends. It is also the perfect opportunity to meet your neighbors and make new friends in the area. Your waterfront home is something to be really proud of and having a party will show your space at its best. Here are some great ways to make sure that your housewarming is one to be remembered.

Install beautiful lighting

When you have a home on the waterfront, you are surrounded by beautiful reflections. You can use this to your advantage when you’re throwing a housewarming, and create a truly atmospheric backdrop with lighting. If your party is in the evening, fill your home with soft sheen lamps or candles in tea light holders. This is even more effective if you have decking in front of your home leading to the water. Your lighting will be reflected in the surface of the water, giving a feeling of even more space. Another way to make your home feel bigger and to focus on the water is to decorate your home with mirrors. It will give your housewarming a modern feel and fill your living area with reflections and subtle illumination.

Serve delicious local cuisine

One of the most wonderful things about living near the water is the availability of seasonal, local food. You can delight your friends by serving them a variety of fish or seafood. Provide your guests with delicate canape style dishes that they can eat while socializing. For instance, marinated shrimp or delicate white fish on skewers will look dainty and taste divine. If your housewarming is a casual party, having a barbecue is a great way to show off the local cuisine and guests can even help with the cooking.

Take the party outside

On a warm summer evening, take your housewarming party outside to look out over the water. Invest in some extra deck chairs, or canvas director’s chairs, that you can get out when you have friends and family over. Put a bar outside so you can serve drinks to your friends, or fill some ice boxes with beers for a more casual party. It’s a good idea to put some citronella candles outside to keep away the insects. They will also fill the air with a wonderful scent. If you are planning an outdoor party, make sure you start an early evening, so that your guests can see the glory of the sun setting over the water.

Enhance the atmosphere with music

Playing some good music is a guaranteed way to give your housewarming party a great atmosphere. Make a housewarming playlist on your streaming service for your party. For a more laid back affair, try some jazz or chillout music. If you are having a wild and lively party, hip hop, Motown, and chart hits will get everyone dancing. Try to include something on your playlist for each age group you have coming to your party. 

A housewarming party is a perfect way to celebrate your beautiful new waterfront house. You will enjoy a beautiful evening and possibly make new friends in your area.

The Bird-Friendly Waterfront Home

by Lucy Hudson

Designing a Bird-Friendly Waterfront Home

Waterfront homes are worth $134 billion nationally as of June 2018 with transactions for these types of properties ranging between 0.4-06% of all real estate dealings. Living close to a body of water such as a lake, ocean or river commands a premium price with great views, access to the water and even gorgeous wildlife such as birds. Unfortunately, bird deaths are also substantial due to collisions and crashes. Thus,

Discourage Birds from Flying into Windows

There are about 300 species of birds that live on or near the sea including puffers, albatrosses, tropic birds and pelicans. Alas, collision with glass is not uncommon and each year, bird mortality is estimated to be between 365 million to 988 million. The reflection of the water on the windows make birds believe that it is an extension of the waterway, sea or sky.

Although new glass technology is available such as UV, patterned, translucent or opaque glass, not everyone can afford expensive window renovations to their waterfront property. Fortunately, there are several ways to minimize bird crashes and ensure that birds are safe. Putting decals on windows and applying window films warn birds not to fly into windows. Chimes around your glass windows also alert them of possible dangers. Drawing curtains partially during the day also helps, as well as installing internal shades and blinds. At night, avoiding lights near windows that attract birds reduces collisions and crashes. It also prevents dangerous conditions for night-migrating birds that may be drawn to the light and unable to break away.

Making Your Home Inviting and Safe

Keeping your waterfront home bird-friendly is an important consideration if there are substantial bird populations in your vicinity. At the same time, you’ll want to entice birds on your property and welcome them. Putting a birdbath in your garden, providing food and nesting shelter are great options to encourage them to stay for a while or make frequent visits. Flowers, shrubs and other plants that are endemic to the area are familiar to the local bird population. They will likely stop by for food and shelter when they see native landscapes.

In turn, birds control insect and rodent infestation and reduce the transmission of diseases, and regenerate habitats. For property owners, they get to bird-watch right in their own backyards.

Waterfront homes are simply divine. They allow access to the water, offer great views and other water-based recreational facilities. Wildlife is also fantastic with the presence of birds providing pleasure to humans. Keeping them safe by bird-proofing windows ensure that collisions and crashes are reduced.

Best Waterfront Locations for Dog Owners and How to Enjoy Them 

Dogs love the ocean

What dog owners need to consider about waterfront homes

by Lucy Hudson

In 2017, a total of about 89.7 million dogs lived in households in the United States as pets. While not all of these dogs and their owners lived in beachfront properties, we’re sure that there are many homeowners who take this into account before settling on the idea of a property near the ocean. If you’re a dog mom or dad, you’ll definitely want to factor in a few things before moving into a waterfront home, such as whether or not the nearby beach is dog-friendly, what the weather is like, whether or not your dog is prepared to live near water and how to ensure they’ll enjoy your new home just as much as you will.

Best Dog-Friendly Waterfront Locations in the U.S.

Ideal waterfront locations for dog owners will need to check a few boxes. In general, they should be cities or small towns where there are a lot of open, natural spaces for dogs to enjoy. They should also be places where parks, restaurants and other establishments openly welcome pets. And, finally, the waterfront areas should be dog-friendly and easily accessible with your furry friend. Taking all of those things into consideration, some of the waterfront cities you’ll most definitely want to take a look at are San Diego, Nantucket, Key West and most of the Georgia coastline. These places are all known not only for their beautiful and fun outdoor experiences but for their pet-friendly environments and places to visit that include numerous dog-friendly beaches and fairly-priced waterfront properties.

 How to Enjoy Beachfront-Living With Your Dog

To get the best out of waterfront-living life with your precious pooch, consider treating them to all-natural toys and food that will ensure they’ve always got something special to play with while you enjoy the waves and serene views. It’s worth taking a look at signing up for a subscription box specifically designed for your dog and browsing through something like pooch perks reviews will reveal just how much dogs and their owners love subscription boxes like these. Your dog will love receiving a new box full of surprises each month and it’s a great way to ensure you and your pup are encouraged to get outside and try out the new toys instead of taking the waterfront views and nearby waves for granted.

Getting the Most Out of Waterfront Living 

There aren’t many drawbacks to living in a waterfront property. With tranquil views, the sound of water and natural spaces to relax you, investing in a waterfront home is a great option even if you have a dog you want to bring along with you. Ensuring that you’re looking for a home that is in a dog-friendly area will be your first order of business, and then you can begin to assess the preparedness of your dog in order to ensure they’ll be safe around water. Once you’ve got that all figured out, treat them to a monthly treat box to entice them out to play near the water and they’ll fall in love with the place probably quicker than you will.

Fix-Up Your Waterfront Home Before You Move In

by Lucy Hudson

If you have invested in a waterfront home or a water view home — or are planning to do so in the near future, there are some essential areas that you need to confirm are in order, and possibly fix-up,

Lake view at dusk

before moving in. The excitement of getting to finally live that dream should not deter you from ensuring that your new property meets all your expectations. The government, in fact, offers various options that could help you bring down the costs of any repairs and renovations, which you should take advantage of if you qualify. If and when you have that settled, look out for these three critical areas before you occupy your new home.

Flood protection and mitigation

Unsurprisingly, one of the biggest potential hazards of living near the water is flooding. Flooding is one of the most common but also devastating disasters in the United States. The first steps you should take should be towards prevention and mitigation. Critically, electrical systems, as well as other outdoor units such as tanks and generators, should be well anchored and elevated. This is important in preventing fires and other kinds of damage.

You should also consider whether your homeowner insurance has adequate coverage for potential damages from flooding. Another mitigative measure involves ensuring that your your house number and street name are clearly illuminated. This helps emergency services in case they need to find the location of your house quickly. Just a few seconds of delay could make the difference between a successful and unsuccessful outcome.

Fixing the guttering

Living near a water body means that it’s more likely to rain often, which automatically makes the guttering system crucial in your new home. The gutters and downspouts are important as a channel to collect and store water, but they also help to prevent damage on your walls, decks, porches, and ceiling. If dilapidated and non-functional, the best solution is to remove and replace the whole system. This might of course be quite expensive, but it is worth the value in the long run.

If the system is in good shape though, it is important to ensure that it is clean before you move in. Clear out all the dirt and then install guards to prevent dirt from accumulating again. This is useful in keeping out debris, while still allowing water to flow into the system.

Water and the dock

In most instances, the whole point of owning a waterfront or water view home is to have a good view of and access to the water. If these two things are not in order, you will definitely not be able to make the most of your new home. To gain better sight of the water, you might have to trim or clear obstructing bushes and trees.

And, if you bought the property with the idea to either go swimming, boating or fishing, accessibility to the water is obviously absolutely important. You need to, therefore, ensure that you have a clear route to the water and a strong and functional dock.

Safety, comfort and convenience are some of the most key aspects to be considered before buying or moving in into any new property. Once you can rest easy on these, you are ready to fully enjoy your new home.

waterfront home decoration

Make Your New Waterfront Home Sparkle

The news is out: waterfront property isn’t as expensive as it used to be, according to a market analysis by Forbes. That means now may be the time to start looking and thinking about making that big purchase. And once you’ve completed the exciting task of finding and purchasing a waterfront home, there’s another difficult process: decorating. The commanding views and dynamic lighting of a waterfront property can make interior design even more intimidating and demanding than with a landlocked home. There are, however, many well used methods for setting up your new dwelling in a way that harmonizes the beauty of both the interior and exterior – a good idea for anyone interested in living well.

Living/Dining Room

The centerpiece of a beach house will of course always be the water itself, so care should be taken so that each room complements and responds to the view. Nowhere is this more important than in the living/dining room; the rooms that you and your guests will undoubtedly spend the most time. One of the most important design concerns is how light will play out in the room. Think about where and when the light will be best in the house, and how it will move over time. Can you place the dining room table in a space where you won’t be blinded every dinner? Can you set up a nice space for cocktails where the view can be appreciated in the early evening? Use the windows as centerpieces and design out from there. Mirrors can help make spaces feel bigger, brighter, and more open, without distracting from windows. Try to space furniture so that eyes of guests are drawn naturally to the view.

Bedrooms

Both personal and guest bedrooms provide a space to be a little bit more playful with decor, and to develop a theme for the home (just don’t go overboard). Bedrooms can be arranged around windows, but since they are smaller less care needs to be taken when placing furniture. It’s better to focus on picking colors and small objects that complement and highlight the exterior view than to distract with large decorative pieces. Try to treat each bedroom as a subtle response to it’s exterior. A guest bedroom (or street facing living room away from the water) can be a great place for a nice entertainment center incorporating a large screen and state-of-the-art speaker system. Or if you want to have a few spaces that are quirky, guest bedrooms are a natural place for this too.

Kitchen

The kitchen is perfect for working on thematic decor, as well as developing more interior focused design. Because there aren’t usually large furniture pieces in a kitchen, small decorative decisions can have an outsize impact here. The kitchen is also a good space to make unique; a room that says a little about the homeowners. It’s important to keep in mind both functional and aesthetic goals here, as this will be one of the rooms that gets the most use.

Tying it all together

Once you’ve got a theme picked and the furniture arranged just so comes the most exciting part: enjoying the view and fine tuning the details. After the big decisions have been made, setting up a home can be a much less involved, and more fun process of small tweaks and trial periods. All it takes is a bit of work, trial and error, and conscious decision making to find yourself comfortable and relaxed in a new waterfront home.

by Lucy Hudson

Private Until Proven Public: New Law Restricts Public Access to Florida’s Beaches

Private Until Proven Public

 

For many Floridians, there’s only one way to spend the Fourth of July – at the beach. Each year, thousands commemorate our nation’s freedom by flocking to the roughly 600 beaches of coastal Florida.  As fireworks paint the sky shades of red, white, and blue, friends and strangers sit shoulder to shoulder on the shores below – a fitting celebration of the hard-earned rights, majestic natural lands, and solidarity shared by fellow Americans. And Floridians have long taken public beach access as a right.

best fireworks shows

Cape Coral: the largest 4th of July fireworks display in Southern Florida.

On Independence Day this year, however, those in the Sunshine State will have a bit less liberty to celebrate – and a lot less beach on which to do so.  

A newly passed state law allows Florida’s waterfront property owners to restrict public access to the sandy shores that fall within their property lines.  Signed a few weeks ago by Governor Rick Scott – despite the impassioned opposition of thousands of activists and beachgoers from throughout the state – House Bill 631 effectively strips the people of Florida of their right, which has been protected since the state’s inception, to recreational access to the state’s coastal lands.  

Public Access to Florida Beaches: A Brief History

The relationship between public beach access and private property rights is a sticky, often complicated issue that has been the subject of countless legal disputes between private owners and municipal or state governments.

Public trust doctrine – the ancient legal principle that governments may protect certain natural resources for public use – has long maintained the common law right of state governments to hold in trust all beaches for public use. Today, each individual state is responsible for articulating, interpreting, and enforcing the particular guidelines that determine which beach land may be designated as public.

In Florida, coastal land below the “mean high water line” – all parts of the shore that become awash during high tide – have been arduously defended by municipal governments as open to the public, irrespective of private property lines.  Wet sand has always been treated as belonging to the public domain, and while many beachfront property owners have fought to restrict public encroachment on their land, public trust doctrine has routinely been used to maintain the right to public access.  

Local governments have often adopted “customary use ordinances” to preserve these rights, by identifying the state’s long and storied tradition of public use.  In a landmark ruling in 1974 – City of Daytona Beach v. Tona-Rama, Inc. – the court enforced the public’s right to access a privately owned stretch of Daytona Beach by citing the deep, long-established connection between Florida’s coastal lands and its inhabitants: “No part of Florida is more exclusively hers, nor more properly utilized by her people,” the ruling proclaimed, “than her beaches.  And the right of the public of access to, and enjoyment of, Florida’s oceans and beaches has long been recognized by this Court.”

The case also established a legal precedent that would yield enormous influence in similar disputes in the decades that followed.  “If the recreational use of the sandy area adjacent to mean high tide has been ancient, reasonable, without interruption and free from dispute,” the court reasoned, “such use, as a matter of custom, should not be interfered with by the owner.”  The case of Trepanier v. County of Volusia, in 2007, helped establish a means by which customary use could be systematically proven, through “eyewitness testimony, expert testimony, and aerial photographs of the general are of the beach.” Often, just a longtime local’s testimony, together with old family photographs of a trip to the shore, would be enough to establish customary use, and public beach access, within a contested beach region.  

But those days are over.  With the passage of HB 631, it is no longer in the hands of municipal governments to proclaim customary use; now, that capacity belongs solely to judges.  Under the new law, customary use can only be proven in court, on a case-by-case basis, using ample and convincing evidence. Local governments no longer have the legal right to enforce public beach access to private beaches by passing customary use ordinances; the process has been moved to the judicial realm.  

Public beach access

While private property owners previously had to build their case, the onus is now on members of the public to obtain judicial affirmation of customary use.  To put it another way: for years, Florida’s coast was regarded as public until proven private, but now, it is private until proven public. Beachfront owners are now legally allowed to prohibit the public from walking along the sands above the high-tide line, whether by roping off parts of their beach property, constructing fences, or putting up signs.  

Opponents of the new law assert that it benefits a few at the expense of many.  Public beaches, they argue, are the heart of Floridian culture, extending all the way back beyond the state’s beginnings.  Others warn that the ruling will cripple Florida’s tourism industry – the lifeblood of the state economy.

Private beach

Florida Beach Laws Change

It is no coincidence that we celebrate our nation’s freedom and solidarity all along our coastal lands.  In commemorating our nation’s independence, we celebrate the rights afforded to us as a result of our freedom – the hard-fought liberties it is our obligation to preserve.  Chief among them is our right to enjoy the beautiful shores of our nation’s coasts.

As thousands of Americans descend upon the shores of the Sunshine State this Fourth of July – just three days after HB 631 officially goes into effect – we may do well to remember what it is we are celebrating.  We may do well to remember the words to an old folk tune we know so well – a Woody Guthrie song that has been hailed, appropriately, as a national anthem in its own right – and which has become, to many Americans, synonymous with Independence Day celebrations:

“This land is your land, this land is my land

From California, to the New York island

From the Redwood Forest, to the Gulf Stream waters

This land was made for you and me

And we may do well to remember an earlier version of the song, with a lesser known but particularly timely verse:

“There was a big high wall there that tried to stop me.

The sign was painted, said ‘Private Property.’

But on the backside, it didn’t say nothing.

This land was made for you and me.”

 

 

Realtor.com: America’s Most Affordable Beach Towns

Looking for that dream house by sand and surf but not sure where to start? Realtor.com has done the research for you and found the most affordable — and least affordable — beach towns in the United States:

http://www.realtor.com/news/trends/top-10-most-affordable-and-expensive-beach-towns/?identityID=573d283fd20bb3c3ac0298e3&MID=2017_0602_WeeklyNL&RID=340363962&cid=eml-2017-0602-WeeklyNL-blog_1_expensivebeachtowns-blogs_trends

Paradise Found

For most folks, the appeal of beachfront living is the ability to open one’s blinds in the morning and watch the sunrise over calm waters just outside; it is the freedom to take a dip, a boat ride, or a stroll along the shore at one’s leisure; it is the luxury of enjoying a glass of wine from the deck as one gazes out upon the moonlit water below. For most folks, it is the myriad pleasures afforded by proximity to water that encourage them to seek out waterfront homes, rather than the actual homes themselves.

But every now and then, there comes along a home that manages to deliver on both fronts; a home that offers all the perks of waterfront living, yet also stands alone as an architectural masterpiece. The home found at 2-2680 E. Cliff Dr., #8, in Santa Cruz, California, is just such a masterpiece.

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Designed by Patti Boe, a realtor, artist and jewelry designer whose pieces have been featured in exclusive New York City galleries, this home was masterfully created to provide an experience similar to what one would encounter in an underwater cave. Inspired by her trips to the Yucatán Peninsula, Belize, and Honduras, Boe sought to create a home that encapsulated the tropical feel of the Caribbean Islands. Every aspect of the home has been specially designed to embody the white sand, clear blue waters, and vibrant wildlife one would find while swimming in the Caribbean.

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Smooth, undulating counters of polished concrete run throughout the entire house, giving the impression of sea cave walls; etched glass of light-blue suggests the swirl of underwater currents; bamboo floors awash with curving blue hint at tidal waters lapping a sandy beach. All walls, ceilings, and counters appear to melt and flow into one another, transforming the entire space into an extension of the beautiful beach setting just outside. A tropical fish tank designed and installed by John DiGarlamo – who helped design parts of the Monterey Bay Aquarium – further blurs the division between indoor and outdoor, contributing to the overall immersive experience of being underwater. Cool white walls adorned with original artwork, seashells scattered here and there – some fossilized and embedded around the glass bathroom sinks – and a large iguana statue further add to the beach ambiance. Transitioning through the home gives the impression of floating through an underwater grotto of crystal clear turquoise water. Ample windows and skylights offer constant sea breeze and sunshine throughout the entire interior.

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From the bedroom, one is afforded an unimpeded view of the Pacific, all the way out to the Boardwalk. The Santa Cruz Wharf and Lighthouse at Steamer Lane are visible from the bed, and skylights overhead offer dazzling views of the star- and moonlit sky at night. Outside, a lawn and patio overlook the ocean, with 200-degree views stretching all the way to Monterey, Pacific Grove, and Lighthouse Point.

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A 13-step descent via a hidden pathway brings you to the best beach in all of Santa Cruz, where whale and dolphin sightings are the norm. Seals and otters flailing by the jetties, seagulls lazing above, and pelicans diving down into the waves to find fish are an everyday sight. With two jetties on either side, the surf is great; it is not uncommon to find professional surfers less than a hundred yards out, sometimes with film crews capturing them on camera.

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This home is every bit as breathtaking as the pristine swath of beach right in its backyard. As soon as you set foot in this livable work of art, you are transported to the clear turquoise waters of the Yucatán. Experience it for yourself, and make every day a Caribbean vacation!

Celebrity Beachfront Living

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Leonardo DiCaprio put his Malibu beach house on the market last month, after 18 years of ownership. His asking price? A cool $10.95 million.

DiCaprio purchased the home in 1998, on the heels of the release of Titanic – the colossally popular film that catapulted him into mega stardom. The modern, bungalow-style house is modestly sized – just 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, and built on a lot that is less than one-fifth of an acre – but is listed at almost seven times the cost of what DiCaprio originally paid for it.

The house underwent a number of renovations while owned by the Academy Award winner, however, including a new wooden deck – replete with Pacific Ocean-facing hot tub – and a recently upgraded kitchen.

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The home also offers a spacious patio with a stairway leading directly to Carbon Beach – a popular spot among the town’s many celebrities. A gem among Malibu beach real estate, the house is expected to fetch its full listing price, if not more.

Another celebrity-owned oceanfront estate currently up for sale – hip-hop star Lil Wayne’s Miami Beach mansion – is a bigger, flashier alternative to DiCaprio’s quaint, 1,765-square-foot bungalow.

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At 15,101-square-feet, the three-story home contains nine bedrooms, nine bathrooms, a movie theater, a rooftop skate park, a professional recording studio, a shark tank, and even a separate, three-bedroom guesthouse.

The rapper – whose real name is Dwayne Carter Jr. – initially listed the home in April of 2015 for $18 million, but dropped the price to $14 million in July of this year when it failed to generate serious interest among buyers. Less than two months later, Carter Jr. again lowered the price of the mansion, this time to $12 million – $6 million below its original listing.

With a heavily-windowed façade of colliding geometric planes, the house – painted entirely white, inside and out – boasts a sleek, modern aesthetic. The pool and palm trees in the backyard of the house further contribute to the home’s distinctly-Miami look and feel, as do the koi pond, the glass elevator, and its carefully manicured lawns. A narrow pier lining the water’s edge leads to a private boating dock.

The house received news coverage in August of this year, when it was descended upon by SWAT teams who were responding to a caller claiming that a man had been shot at the home. The SWAT team members reportedly conducted a thorough search and found nothing to substantiate the claims.

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It’s anyone’s guess as to whether the estate will soon sell, or if Lil Wayne will have to further slash its asking price, and stomach the loss on his investment. The house is perched atop La Gorce Island – one of the premier islands off of Miami Beach – and it overlooks a canal leading into Biscayne Bay. At $795 per square foot, the home is priced well below the $965-per-square-foot average among homes on La Gorce Island.

Coastline Sustainability

coast-erosion

Public beach along the coasts of the United States has become increasingly privatized and developed over the past half-century. Accompanying this development has been a massive influx of fences, barricades, jetties, and other barriers intended to keep the public away from these privately owned beaches. According to a growing number of recent reports by scientists and environmentalists, these types of barriers play an enormous role in the destruction of our coasts.

The 1960s marked the beginning of the rampant development of shoreline property along our coasts. The efforts of oceanfront property owners, private homeowners’ associations, and coastal municipalities to restrict public access to beaches – and thereby ensure the exclusivity and marketability of their properties – have led to the increasing privatization of America’s sandy shores. As once-public stretches of beach became privately owned, a number of unsustainable development practices proliferated.

Tidal lands, instrumental in soaking up floodwaters, were drained and developed. Sand dunes, which play a crucial role in blocking rising tides, were bulldozed to the ground to maximize ocean views. Jetties, sea walls, and bulkheads were constructed to defend against the assault of incoming tides, but ended up accelerating erosion. Landowners went to great lengths to wall off their stretches of beach from the public, and to delineate their oceanfront property from that of their neighbors. Dikes, fences, and other physical barriers were thrown up by the heap.

According to a New York Times article published in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, these measures contribute significantly to the damage inflicted on coastal lands by hurricanes. The development of tidal lands and the removal of sand dunes have left the Eastern and Southern Seaboards increasingly vulnerable to the assault of hurricanes and other storms. Without tidal lands to soak up floodwaters, or sand dunes to serve as buffers between the ocean and the coast, coastal lands have been subjected to vicious damage at the hands of coastal storms. Jetties, sea walls, bulkheads, fences, and all other sorts of barricades erected by developers to lessen the effects of tidal waters are no match against the powerful winds and tides of such storms, and they are invariably washed ashore at tremendous speeds, and at great costs.

Even without the added impact of hurricanes and storms, these measures – particularly the development of tidal lands and the removal of sand dunes – have made much of our coastline far more susceptible to the effects of erosion and rising sea levels. Without these natural buffers, coastal lands all across the nation are at far greater risk of being eroded, and of being battered by storms.

According to a growing number of scientists, our best defense against the destruction of our coasts would be to declare our coasts public again. An “open beaches” act would put a stop to the harmful – and futile – efforts by private property owners to hold back the sea. It would put an end to the fencing off of public beaches as private domain. And it would better ensure the future of America’s increasingly threatened coasts.